Fiberglass

Definition - What does Fiberglass mean?

Fiberglass refers to a strong, lightweight material that consists of thin fibers of glass that can be transformed into a woven layer or used as reinforcement. Fiberglass is less strong and stiffer than carbon fiber-based composites, but less brittle and cheaper.

Fiberglass is versatile and considered a foundation of the composites industry. It has shown excellent strength, low weight, bendability and dimensional stability.

Fiberglass is commonly used in aircraft, boats, automobiles, swimming pools, storage tanks, roofing, pipes, cladding and casts.

Corrosionpedia explains Fiberglass

Fiberglass is a kind of fiber-reinforced plastic and this reinforcement fiber is made from glass fiber. Depending on the applications of fiberglass, a variety of glass is used. These glasses are made from silica or silicate and small amounts of oxides of calcium, magnesium and sometimes boron. In this case, the defects in glass fibers should be low.

Fiberglass is used with a hardener like polyester fiberglass resin and other resins that need a liquid hardener. Fiberglass fabricators also provide baffle wall systems for both potable water and wastewater applications. As fabricators, fiberglass provides a quick and affordable way to build parts and molds, makes repairs easy to handle, and can withstands extreme environmental situations.

Fiberglass possesses unique attributes that make it naturally corrosion and staining-resistant. These features make it very suitable to use in windows and doors for coastal climates and industrial applications as building exteriors.

Fiberglass is electrically non-conductive, is used as an insulator, and eliminates chances of galvanic corrosion in coastal environments. This characteristic makes it advantageous to use in the underground mining industry.

Fiberglass-reinforced plastic made from fiberglass is one of the toughest and most durable substances on earth. Therefore, it is often used to construct tanks, piping, scrubbers, beams and gratings.

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