Dry Fall

Definition - What does Dry Fall mean?

Dry fall is the term for paints or coatings that are formulated so that when applied at specified conditions, their droplets or overspray rapidly dry into a dust-like state before reaching a certain distance (usually around 10 feet from the point of application). As such, wet sticky paint that sticks on and ruins surfaces can be avoided; the dry overspray is easy to clean by wiping or sweeping.

Low temperature and high humidity are major factors that increase the drying time of paint droplets or overspray.

Dry fall is also known as dry-fog or spray-safe coatings.

Corrosionpedia explains Dry Fall

Spraying dry fall is the most efficient and convenient way to paint or coat high ceilings, beams and large surfaces in commercial and industrial structures. Application by brush or roller is inefficient, inconvenient and even difficult sometimes.

Spraying with traditional coatings without dry fall properties produces droplets or overspray that could easily spread to the surrounding areas and fall wet on surfaces. This requires containment structures as well as protective covers for the surfaces below the areas being sprayed on because overspray is an environmental hazard and can damage nearby properties.

The use of dry fall coatings has proven to be the solution to the overspray as well as the inefficiency issues of coating with brushes and rollers. Other advantages of spraying dry fall coatings include but are not limited to the following:

  • Dry fall’s high hiding property allows it to cover most surfaces in one coat or pass, even when wet, due to its high pigment content.
  • Easy to clean and resists dirt pickup, fume discoloration and dirt retention. This translates to lower cleaning as well as repainting costs.
  • Labor cost savings – the coating’s fast-drying capability shortens the project’s completion time.

Dry fall is available in waterborne and solvent-borne formulations. For the best results, users should choose the most appropriate dry fall coating for their specific environments and application requirements.

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