Decomposition Potential

Definition - What does Decomposition Potential mean?

A decomposition potential, in electrochemistry, is the difference in the electrode potential between an electrolytic cell's cathode and anode in order for electrolysis to occur. It is the minimum voltage produced from an electrolytic cell and is used in the electrolysis process.

It is also known as decomposition voltage.

Corrosionpedia explains Decomposition Potential

In a decomposition potential, a minimum voltage is produced when performing a continuous electrolysis process. In the electrolysis process, metals or compounds are refined and impurities are removed at a low cost.

One example of the electrolysis process is the Hall-Héroult process, which is used for aluminum metals or for producing hydrogen from water. It is performed in large scale where hundreds of metal sheets are connected to a power source and an electric voltage is passed through the sheets.

Other example is copper is electroplated on the cathodes from an anode and the impurities settle to the bottom; the resulting copper is 99.99% pure.

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