Are there CUI concerns for operating temperatures over 350°F?

David Shong
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David Shong is the Senior Western Specification Representative for Industrial Insulation Group (IIG LLC). He has spent his entire career in the construction materials industry and developed an early passion for insulation. David’s role involves providing educational assistance to owners, EPC firms, consulting engineers, facility maintenance personnel and mechanical contractors regarding the benefits and design guidelines in specifying mid to high temperature industrial pipe and vessel insulation. He is primarily responsible for Western United States and Canada, but is always happy to engage with anyone that would like to discuss industrial insulation applications. Full Bio

Q:

Regarding the operating temperature on equipment, is there no CUI issue if it’s above 350°F? If yes—and this is the most important part—what about an operating condition where the equipment is cyclic or in shutdown mode?

A:

Absolutely. The corrosion range has kind of been established from 100 to 350°F for mild steel, and 350°F is really kind of the upper limit where liquid water can exist before it vaporizes into its gaseous state.

I definitely would not say that only equipment that operates in between that temperature range is subject to CUI. Every piece of equipment in an industrial facility, in my opinion, is subject to CUI because of the high temperature ranges that are often cyclical, which will drop down into the CUI range. And then, also, during maintenance and outages, you will see that equipment brought down out of service, and you can see significant amounts of time where it's in that CUI danger range.

So, definitely, we want to help people understand what that bandwidth is really. Don't think that if you don’t have something operating in that operating condition, then you won't have to worry. CUI can occur at any operating temperature range because of those cyclical and outage conditions.

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