Antifouling Coating

Definition - What does Antifouling Coating mean?

Antifouling coating is a type of specialized coating that is usually applied on ship or boat hulls to inhibit organism growth on the hull. The presence of organisms in this part of the vessel could greatly affect its durability and performance.

Other than fighting the growth of microorganisms, this paint also serves as a corrosion barrier for hulls, which improves performance and water flow across the vessel hull.

Antifouling coating is also known as bottom paint.

Corrosionpedia explains Antifouling Coating

Antifouling coating prevents fouling growth through the production of ingredients that prevent organisms from settling. Its use plays a huge role in decreasing not only the commercial costs of vessels, but the total operational expenses of maritime industries and others.

For instance, fuel constitutes more than half of the entire operating costs of vessels. If antifouling coatings are not used, the consumption of fuel as well as the emission of carbon dioxide could raise significantly. This can be the same in other industrial machinery.

Moreover, most high-quality antifouling coatings could deliver lifetime benefits like extended intervals of dry dock or decreased dry dock, which in turn lowers maintenance expenses as well as harmful emissions. Additionally, this type of coating prevents hull and other metal structures from undergoing corrosion. Antifouling coating can improve the corrosion resistance of steel structures other than stopping the growth of microorganisms.

There are various types of antifouling coatings ranging from linear-polishing polymer (LPP) as well as the more advanced self-polishing copolymers (SPCs). With this type of product, operators can effectively extend the life of vessels and other structures, reducing the entire operation's costs.

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