Alloy Steel

Definition - What does Alloy Steel mean?

Alloy steel is a type of steel that has undergone alloying using different elements in levels between 1% and 50% in weight in order to enhance mechanical properties. It can be classified further into two types: high-alloy and low-alloy steels.

Alloy steels possess properties like increased durability and higher resistance to corrosion.

Corrosionpedia explains Alloy Steel

Steel is a type of metal alloy that contains mostly iron with minute carbon levels, depending on the quality or grade of steel. However, alloy steel is any steel where one or more of its elements aside from carbon have been added intentionally to achieve more desirable characteristics.

Some of the most common elements that are added to generate alloy steels include:

  • Manganese
  • Silicon
  • Molybdenum
  • Chromium
  • Vanadium
  • Nickel

The difference is somewhat uniform, but to make it distinguishable, all steel alloyed with higher than 8% of its weight of elements other than carbon and alloy is considered high-alloy steel. Alloyed steels are harder, more durable and more resistant to corrosion.

Alloy steels with carbon levels of medium to elevated rates are difficult to weld. However, if the carbon levels are reduced to 1% to 3%, such alloy metals can achieve greater formability and weldability, thus, improved strength.

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