Jointing Compounds

Definition - What does Jointing Compounds mean?

Jointing compounds are the white matter comparable to plaster that is applied in order to seal joints that exist between drywall sheets. These compounds are mainly used in construction of buildings.


These compounds come in various forms such as lightweight, setting and all purpose.


Jointing compounds are also known as drywall compound, joint cement and mud.


Corrosionpedia explains Jointing Compounds

Jointing compounds are typically used to hang drywall in remodeled or new homes. The application can be very easy, taking as much as three coats. When applied to new surfaces, this compound can efficiently seal all flaws from the drywall surface, like hanging tape and holes.


Moreover, jointing compounds can be applied to corner beads, gypsum panels, skim coatings, fasteners and trims. It also serves as a handy tool for correcting minor damage or imperfections to walls. It easily fixes bumps, tears, holes and other forms of slight damage.


There are three types of jointing compounds:


· Setting: This one is usually available in small boxes and comes as a powder or plaster of Paris (POP). This joint compound is combined with water when needed only, since it hardens very quickly. It dries as hard as stone and shrinks minimally. Since it has quick drying properties, real taping can be performed without the need to wait.


· Lightweight type: This type is perfect for embedding tape as well as the succeeding layers. This one is usually available in bucket sizes and hardens via evaporation. Hence, a 24-hour waiting period should be observed between applying coats. This should be applied in its full strength or slightly thinned when applying on top layers. One advantage with this is that it scratches and sands easily. It is bit costly, but worth it.


· All purpose: This type is also called a soupy jointing compound. This is less adhesive and easy to apply. It is great for coating and is the top choice of the pros. It can be applied quickly and sets very fast as well. This type can harden in as fast as five minutes.

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