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Hot-Dip Galvanizing (HDG)

Definition - What does Hot-Dip Galvanizing (HDG) mean?

Hot-dip galvanizing (HDG) is the process of coating iron, steel or ferrous materials with a layer of zinc. This done by passing the metal through molten zinc at a temperature of 860°F (460°C) to form zinc carbonate (ZNC03). Zinc carbonate is a strong material that protects steel and can prevent corrosion in many circumstances. Hot-dip galvanizing can be carried out cheaply and in large batches.

Hot-dip galvanizing is also known as hot-dip coating.

Corrosionpedia explains Hot-Dip Galvanizing (HDG)

Hot-dip galvanizing involves three main steps:


  1. Preparation: The galvanizing reaction will only occur on a chemically clean surface, so the first step of the process involves removing contamination. First, the metal is degreased using a caustic solution and then dipped in hydrochloric acid to remove rust, mill scale, welding slag, paint and grease. This followed by a rinse and a dip in a flux solution, which is usually about 30 percent zinc ammonium chloride.

  2. Galvanizing: When the clean iron or steel component is dipped into the molten zinc (at 842°F (450°C)), zinc-iron alloy layers form as a result of a metallurgical reaction between the iron and zinc. When the material is pulled from the galvanizing bath, a layer of molten zinc is present on top of the alloy layer. When it cools, it has the bright, shiny appearance associated with galvanized products.
  3. Inspection: After galvanizing, the coated materials are inspected for coating thickness and coating appearance. A variety of simple physical and laboratory tests may be performed to determine thickness, uniformity, adherence and appearance of the zinc coating.
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