Hard Chromium Plating

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Definition - What does Hard Chromium Plating mean?

Hard chrome plating is a process applied to ferrous and nonferrous materials in order to:

  • Enhance abrasion resistance and wear
  • Decrease friction
  • Prevent galling and seizing
  • Re-establish undersized parts' dimensions

This type of plating offers excellent abrasion resistance despite high levels of contact stress. It also yields low corrosion and wear rate, and is believed to be 100 times superior to hardened steels.

Hard chrome plating is also known as industrial chrome.

Corrosionpedia explains Hard Chromium Plating

Hard chrome plating is widely used since it is ultra hard. In fact, it is harder than almost all counter faces and abrasives used in many industries. It has an impressive hardness that can withstand high levels of stress contact. It also offers superior adhesion higher than 10,000 psi. However, substrates must be subjected to thorough cleaning before plating ensure they are completely free from contamination. Superb adhesion is achieved through the plating itself.

Hard chrome plating is a type of electrolytic process that makes use of an electrolyte that is based in chromic acid. This part is regarded as the cathode and as DC current travels through lead anodes, chromium forms on the surface of the component.

Hard chrome plating is applicable to materials like:

  • Stainless steel
  • Ferrous metals
  • Alloys
  • Non-ferrous metals like brass and copper

Hard chrome plating can be applied to many different substrates like:

  • High alloyed metals
  • Cast irons
  • Titanium alloys
  • Brasses
  • Bronzes
  • Copper alloys

Abrasion is one of the most common processes of destruction identified by various industries. Hence, making use of hard chrome plating can solve many issues faced by industries like:

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Nuclear
  • Lawn and garden
  • Food
  • Chemical
  • Oil
  • Mining
  • Gas
  • Textile
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