Oil Based Coating

Definition - What does Oil Based Coating mean?

Oil based coatings are those coatings that contain drying oils. Once this coating is applied it reacts with oxygen and the basic film-forming process occurs, converting the wet film into a solid film.

The drying oil that is a major constituent of oil based coatings is fatty vegetable oil, which chemically reacts with oxygen present in the air. Eventually, the oil hardens and dries.

Corrosionpedia explains Oil Based Coating

Oil based coatings are commonly used as a coating base to protect the adhesion of surface paint for industrial equipment and infrastructure.

The drying oil present in these oil based coatings have various consistencies and drying rates, so the processing methods of drying oils differ. In general, the hardening or oil curing results from the process of autoxidation (i.e., the addition of oxygen into organic compounds). This starts with the insertion of oxygen molecules to the bonds between hydrogen and carbon.

As the oil based coating dries, more changes occur, such as the ester bonds present in the oil go through hydrolysis, which releases fatty acids. These fatty acids act in response to metals and generate metal carboxylates that help to provide corrosion protection to metals. Thus, in industrial settings the oil based coatings play a vital role in protecting the metal and preventing the formation of rust.

Drying oil is a major component of varnishes and other anti-corrosion coatings.

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