Aliphatic Solvent

Definition - What does Aliphatic Solvent mean?

Aliphatic solvents are in the category of aliphatic compounds. Aliphatic solvents do not contain a benzene ring. They are mixtures of saturated, long straight chain (normal-paraffin), branched chain (iso-paraffin) or cyclic paraffins. These solvents are produced by the distillation of crude oil by the appropriate boiling point range fraction, and then are treated to improve their color and odor.

Aliphatic solvents are also known as aliphatic hydrocarbon solvents and non-aromatic compounds.

Corrosionpedia explains Aliphatic Solvent

Since aliphatic solvents are considered to be alphatic compounds, they contain carbon and hydrogen joined together in straight chains, branched trains or non-aromatic rings.

The hydrocarbons of the alkane, alkene and alkyne series are aliphatic compounds, as are fatty acids and many other compounds. Most compounds containing rings are aromatic compounds. Thus, aliphatic compounds are the opposite of aromatic compounds.

In addition to their use as solvents or diluents in paints and thinners, they are widely used in oil extraction, degreasing, rubber manufacturing and as carriers for aerosols and disinfectants. Gasoline and kerosene are examples of aliphatic hydrocarbon solvents. Common aliphatic hydrocarbon solvents used in paints and coatings are mineral spirits, hexanes and heptanes. These compounds are also used as corrosion inhibitors.

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