Dechlorination

Definition - What does Dechlorination mean?

Dechlorination is the process of removing chlorine from water (e.g., disinfected wastewater) before discharging the water into the environment.

Dechlorination is performed because chlorine can form deposits on the internal edges of industrial equipment, cause health issues (e.g., choking) or lead to corrosion.

Corrosionpedia explains Dechlorination

Water is chlorinated for disinfection purposes so it is suitable for consumption and industrial use. However, chlorine is toxic to many aquatic species. Therefore, the water must be dechlorinated before release or disposal.

Dechlorination is typically accomplished by adding sulfur dioxide or sulfite salts such as sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfite or sodium metabisulfite. These are the cheapest solutions available for dechlorination, however there are other methods such as the carbon adsorption process.

Advantages of dechlorinated water:

  • Minimizes harm to aquatic species from contact with toxic chlorine
  • Prevents the formation of harmful chlorinated compounds in drinking water
  • Prevents the accumulation of chlorine in the joints and vacant pores of industrial equipment that may lead to corrosion
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