Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

Definition - What does Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) mean?

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the formation of a non-volatile solid film on a substrate due to the reaction of vapor-phase chemical reactants. CVD is an atmosphere-controlled process conducted at elevated temperatures of around 1925°F (1051°C) in a CVD reactor.


CVD is used to create coatings for a variety of applications such as wear resistance, corrosion resistance, high temperature protection, erosion protection and combinations thereof.

Corrosionpedia explains Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

A basic CVD process consists of the following steps:

  1. A mixture of reactant gases and diluent inert gases are introduced into the reaction chamber.
  2. The gas moves to the substrate.
  3. The reactants are adsorbed on the surface of the substrate.
  4. The reactants undergo chemical reactions with the substrate to form the film.
  5. The gaseous byproducts of the reactions are desorbed and evacuated from the reaction chamber.

Chemical vapor deposition coatings are fine grained, impervious, have high purity and are harder than similar materials produced using conventional ceramic fabrication processes.

This process is a very versatile one that can be used on products that may be difficult to coat with other methods. It is commonly used to protect electronic components, such as integrated circuits, against corrosion.

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