Lacquer Thinner

Definition - What does Lacquer Thinner mean?

Lacquer thinner refers to a mixture of solvents that have the ability to dissolve a number of different resins or plastics used in modern lacquer. It produces harmful fumes and emits a strong odor. It normally contains highly flammable chemicals.

Lacquer thinner is primarily used for thinning lacquer-based paints. It is very suitable for cleaning spray guns and spraying equipment after using lacquer paints.

Corrosionpedia explains Lacquer Thinner

Lacquer thinner may include a combination of the following solvents:

  • toluene
  • xylene
  • methyl ethyl ketone
  • acetone
  • butyl acetate

Lacquer thinner is used to thin, dissolve and clean up lacquer-based paints or lacquer products. It helps to increase the flow and leveling of lacquer; therefore it produces a high-gloss, smooth and streak-free finish.

It is also used to remove ink on metal and adhesive residue from a variety of surfaces. It is extremely strong and quickly evaporates.

Lacquer thinner is normally too caustic for oil paints. It uses toluene as an active ingredient to reduce flammability.

Lacquer thinner should not be added to lacquer all at once; too much will create running and dripping of the lacquer and consequently this will prevent a smooth, high-gloss finish.

It is a superior cleaner compared to mineral spirits, but its odor, toxicity and flammability create problems for home use.

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