Definition - What does Anodic mean?

Anodic means relating to an anode. In an anodic reaction, oxidation occurs, meaning electrons are removed from the anode's surface. An anodic reaction is very important in the corrosion of metals.

Anodic has many derivatives like:

  • Anodic protection
  • Anodic coating
  • Anodic polarization
  • Anodic potential
  • Anodic cleaning
  • Anodic bonding
  • Anodic inhibitors

The anodic reaction is the mechanism of electrochemical corrosion in which the metal forming the anode dissolves in the electrolyte in the form of positively charged ions.

Corrosionpedia explains Anodic

Anodic refers to a positive direction. In anodic polarization, the potential is changed in the anode, causing the working electrode to become the anode and causing electrons to be withdrawn from it.

In the corrosion process, two reactions take place. One is the anodic reaction, in which metal atoms are ionized and pass into solution, leaving their electrons within the original metal surface.

The other is cathodic reaction, in which the free electrons within the metal are taken up by chemical species such as O2 and H2O in reduction reactions.

A corrosion system can be regarded as a short-circuited electrochemical cell in which the anodic process is something like:

    Fe(s) --> Fe2+(aq) + 2 e-
This is the corrosion reaction for iron. This reaction involves the reduction of hydrogen ions to hydrogen gas. This hydrogen evolution reaction occurs with a wide variety of metals and acids.

In anodic protection, it is used to protect metals from corrosion. It is also used for carbon steel storage tanks containing extreme pH environments.

In anodic coating, it utilizes anodizing to provide increased thickness, color and protection to any type of substrate.

In anodic cleaning, it is used before any type of plating.

Anodic inhibitors retard the anodic dissolution of metal, concurrently decreasing the rate of oxide dissolution permitted by the chemical system.

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