Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrography (EDX)

Definition - What does Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrography (EDX) mean?

Energy dispersive X-ray spectrography (EDX) is an analytical method used for chemical characterization and elemental analysis of certain samples.

This technique relies on the interaction of a sample and the X-ray excitation source. Its capabilities to characterize products and materials can be associated with the basic principle that every element has a distinct atomic structure, leading to distinctive peak sets within X-ray spectrum.

Energy dispersive X-ray spectrography is also known as energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA).

Corrosionpedia explains Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrography (EDX)

EDX makes use of the X-ray spectrum that is emitted by solid samples that are bombarded through electron-focused beams. This is in order to obtain a more localized analysis of chemicals. Every element from atomic numbers 4 to 92 can be identified under this principle, although not all methods are appropriate for light elements.

In an EDX system, there are four major components:

  • X-ray or electron beam (excitation source)
  • Pulse processor
  • X-ray detector
  • Analyzer

In EDX, the excess electron energy migrates to a shell in order to fill in new holes in excess of what a single X-ray can emit. The X-ray intensities are gauged by counting the photons and the obtained precision is limited through a statistical error. With this method, it is not difficult to determine precise measurements.

Because it produces better resolution, reduced dead time, faster and more accurate analytical capabilities, this test is highly preferred in terms of material analysis, both qualitative and quantitative.

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