Adherend

Definition - What does Adherend mean?

An adherend is a material attached to another by means of an adhesive substance. An adherend is the surface which adheres to another by adhesion. To protect adhesive failures, it is needed to carefully select and treat adherend.

Proper surface treatment of the adherend is extremely important in assuring strong and lasting bonds between adhesives and adherends. For many adherends, surface preparation requirements go far beyond simple cleanliness. Paint and coating layers can be used to control corrosion of adherend surfaces.

Adherend is also known as substrate.

Corrosionpedia explains Adherend

An adherend is that which adheres to another by adhesion. Adhesion, the attachment between adhesive and adherend, may occur either by mechanical means, in which the adhesive works its way into small pores of the adherend, or by one of several chemical mechanisms. The strength of adhesion depends on many factors, including the means by which it occurs.

Surface preparation is carried out to render adherend surfaces receptive to the development of strong and durable adhesive joints. Selection of the exact surface preparation method for a particular adherend requires careful evaluation. A number of factors influence the choice. The size of component parts and the availability of equipment and facilities are obvious considerations. Less obvious factors include the rapid depletion of active chemicals in an immersion bath or the accumulation of foreign materials in the bath, which give rise to weak boundary layers.

Before adhesive bonding, it is essential to thoroughly clean the adherends. Contaminated adherends are unreceptive to optimal adhesion regardless of the quality of materials used, or the stringent control of the application process. If an adhesive joint is to be strong and permanent, its adherend surfaces must be treated at least to remove oil, dirt and dust.

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