Soda Blasting

Definition - What does Soda Blasting mean?

Soda blasting is a process in which sodium bicarbonate is applied to a surface using compressed air. Soda blasting is the quickest, non-abrasive and environmentally safe way to remove all kinds of coatings, without damage to metal, glass, chrome or warping thin sheets of metal.

Corrosionpedia explains Soda Blasting

Soda blasting is a non-abrasive, non-destructive paint and coating removal method that can be safely used on most surfaces, even glass and wood, and is safe to use on any thin metals. Soda (sodium bicarbonate) is a soft blast media that is ideal for sensitive substrates where the removal of base material is not acceptable.

Soda blasting will not leave a profile signature on the substrate, however it may leave a subtle white film on the surface being treated. Soda blasting has advantages over conventional abrasive medias: it will not warp metal surfaces, create heat or change the integrity of substrates. Soda blasting is very effective for mold and fire/smoke damage cleanup as it cleans and deodorizes.

Soda blasting is a variation on sand blasting, but instead of using sand (or other abrasives such as slag), this process uses baking soda. When the baking soda hits the substrate, it "explodes" into fine particles, removing rust and surface contaminants.

Soda blasting does not require additional clean-up and can be utilized on multiple surfaces attached to one item (such as cars, boats, etc.). It can remove, neutralize and prevent surface rust. However, it may not be suitable to utilize before applying certain types of automotive refinishing methods.

Soda blasting can be used in applications such as:

  • Cleaning
  • Paint stripping
  • Automotive restoration
  • Industrial equipment maintenance
  • Rust removal
  • Graffiti removal
  • Molecular steel passivation against rust
  • Oil removal by saponification and translocation
  • Masonry cleaning and restoration
  • Soot remediation
  • Boat hull cleaning
  • Food processing facilities and equipment

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