Wet-Bulb Temperature

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Definition - What does Wet-Bulb Temperature mean?

Wet-bulb temperature is the lowest level of temperature that can be obtained through evaporative cooling of a ventilated surface covered with ice or wet with water.

It indicates a temperature that is near thermodynamic or real temperature. It is the lowest level of temperature reachable under present ambient conditions brought by water evaporation.

Corrosionpedia explains Wet-Bulb Temperature

For specific air parcels at a known dry-bulb temperature and pressure, the true wet bulb temperature resembles the distinct values of dew point temperature as well as relative humidity.

Wet-bulb temperature is actually the function of ambient air temperature and relative humidity. This type of temperature measures the amount of water vapor that the atmosphere is capable of holding at certain weather conditions. Lower levels of wet-bulb temperature indicate that the air could carry higher amounts of water vapor compared to higher levels of wet-bulb temperature.

Accurate measurement of wet-bulb temperature is very important in various industries. One example is in the selection of cooling cell towers. With this, the wet-bulb temperature of the facility or area involved should be followed. This is to avoid things that may cause corrosion damage such as scale accumulation, improper flow of water as well as loss of air flow throughout the surfaces where there is heat exchange.

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