Welcome to the mid-March edition of the Corrosionpedia News Roundup. In this edition, we highlight CORROSION 2020, one of the largest corrosion-related events held around the world. New products are also mentioned, including a redesign of a popular aluminum wheel that reduces the risk of corrosion and a new marine fuel additive that is rapidly gaining popularity as a defense against marine engine corrosion. Stories about the effect of corrosion on waste products, both nuclear and sewage, are also included.

CORROSION 2020 Begins

CORROSION 2020, the largest conference on corrosion in the world, will take place in Houston, Texas at the George R. Brown Convention Center from March 15 through March 19. The National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) hosts the annual conference. Every year, thousands of professionals involved in the science of corrosion come to the conference to listen to speakers, see the latest advancements in corrosion detection and corrosion prevention, and build connections with other professionals that work to understand and prevent corrosion.

This year, technical programs include symposia on corrosion caused by microbes and studies on pipeline integrity. There will also be networking events such as golfing, happy hours and an award ceremony. For more information, visit http://nacecorrosion.org.

Updated Wheel Provides Increased Corrosion Resistance

Alcoa Wheels has just announced it will be releasing a new design for its Ultra One heavy-duty truck wheel in the near future. The product incorporates new design technologies intended to prevent corrosion. One such design feature is the reduction of contact between the wheel and the hub, which will reduce the area that corrosion can originate and spread. The reduction in corrosion from the Alcoa Wheels Ultra One can save purchasers money in the long run because of quicker, easier removal of the wheels. The newly designed Ultra One wheel can be used to replace Ultra One wheels of the old design.

Corrosion Causes Rupture in Jail Sewage Pipe

The Pueblo County Jail in Pueblo, Colorado has recently experienced a sewage leakage. The leak sprung out of one of its sewage pipes. Investigation into the incident revealed that corrosion was to blame for the rupturing of the 40-year-old section of pipe. Although the breakage only occurred in one area, it was found that an even larger area has undergone extensive corrosion. The sewage spill forced the jail to temporarily reroute some of its operations until crews are able to repair and replace the existing corroded pipe. Biological material such as that found in wastewater in the Pueblo County Jail sewage system can often cause and catalyze corrosive processes to occur.

Nuclear Waste Corrosion

Researchers at Ohio State University have discovered that the design of the metal canisters intended to store nuclear waste in the United States may not be as corrosion resistant as originally expected. By themselves, the canisters are projected to last thousands of years. However, when considering the underground environment they are to be stored in and the entire contents of the nuclear waste canister, the researchers have found that corrosion is accelerated. No nuclear waste has been stored in this underground environment yet, but the study illuminates that more precautions may needed in order to ensure the successful containment of the nuclear waste if the United States decides to go forward with the container burial plan in the future.

New Retail Availability for Marine Corrosion-Preventing Additive

Techron Marine Fuel System Treatment, a Chevron-made fuel additive for marine engines that simultaneously prevents corrosion and stabilizes fuel, is now available for retail purchase at West Marine. The development of the new sales channel is being brought about as demand for the Techron Marine Fuel System Treatment has gone beyond that of professional mariners to more casual marine enthusiasts. Techron Marine Fuel System Treatment can be used for ethanol blend or gasoline-fueled engines. Corrosion can rapidly occur in both freshwater and saltwater marine engine fuel lines where the engines aren't run for extended periods of time. The Techron Marine fuel additive prevents the oxidation of the fuel lines, helping to ensure a longer average life of the marine engines and related components.

Brazilian Offshore Oil and Gas Project to Use Corrosion-Resistant Stainless Steel

The Libra Consortium, a group of multi-billion dollar oil and gas companies, has decided to use corrosion-resistant stainless steel umbilical tubes for its Mero oilfield project. This is a novel method in the Brazilian oil and gas industry because plastics have historically been the material of choice for umbilical tubing. The stainless steel tubing is able to resist corrosion like the previously used thermoplastic tubing while providing additional structural benefits. The provider of the tubing will be Sandvik, which will be using its duplex stainless steel SAF 2507 that is known for its excellent resistance to pitting, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking, especially in environments rich in chlorides.