Electrochemical Equivalent (ECE)

Definition - What does Electrochemical Equivalent (ECE) mean?

An electrochemical equivalent (ECE) is the amount of a substance in grams produced or consumed by the passage of one coulomb of electricity in an electrochemical reaction.

A voltmeter is used to measure the electrochemical equivalent of an element. ECE is mainly used for determining the kinetics of corrosion rates and to estimate the oxidizing power in specific environments.

Electrochemical equivalent can be abbreviated as Eq (grams per coulomb).

Corrosionpedia explains Electrochemical Equivalent (ECE)

ECE can be explained by using Faraday’s first law, which states, "The mass of any substance liberated or deposited at any electrode is directly proportional to the quantity of electricity passed."

The ECE of a metal is equal to the gram-molecular mass of this substance divided by the number of electrons involved in the electrode reaction

Electrochemical equivalents = kA/n

Where k is a constant (0.0373100), A represents gram-molecular weight and n represents principle valence.

When electrochemical equivalent is calculated for zinc, it requires two electrons in order to deposit one atom, so Zn/2 or 65.37/2 multiplied by the constant.

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